Peru in Pictures (Part 2)

KDickinson Photography - PeruRecap: Back in 2010, Matt and I and five of our friends went to Peru with a very loose itinerary.  In fact, the only set plan was to hike the Inca Trail.  Here are some of my favorite shots from  the trip:

Click here to read Part 1.

After spending a restorative couple of hours in Aguas Calientes, we took the train back to Cuzco and woke up very early to catch a bus to Puno.

KDickinson Photography - Peru
Raqchi – An archeological site on the way to Puno. The columns made of stone blocks in the background were part of a large Incan temple.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
La Raya – A gorgeous pit stop at 14,000 feet.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
After we arrived in Puno, we took a boat out to the floating islands on Lake Titicaca.  The islands are actually built by hand using the floating reeds in the shallow part of the lake.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
The island’s inhabitants (Uros) also build their houses, their boats, and make their crafts out of the reeds.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Arequipa –  The drive from Puno to Arequipa was painfully long, but it makes for a funny story now.  We stayed at La Casa de Melgar in the colonial part of town.  This hostel is full of unique charm and is housed in an 18th century building made of white volcanic rock.  So cool!
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Monasterio de Santa Catalina, Arequipa.  Built in 1579 (!) of sillar (white volcanic rock) this convent takes up an entire block! It’s a maze of beautiful architecture and bright, colorful surroundings.  Hiring a guide for the very informative tour is the best way to see this place.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Clay jar laundry at the convent.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
El Misti – This volcano is visible from Arequipa at an imposing 19,000 feet!
KDickinson Photography - Peru
On our bus ride to canyon country (not too far outside of Arequipa), we saw lots of llama and vicuna grazing at the side of the road.

 

KDickinson Photography - Peru
I don’t remember why there are cairns as far as you could see, but I do know that we were over 17,000 feet when our bus stopped to let us wander around this area.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Ancient burial grounds outside of Chivay.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Colca Canyon Panoramic. Matt took this one.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Andean Condor at Colca Canyon.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Nazca Lines – Not the best view but still pretty awesome.  We stopped here on our way to the coast and saw creepy mummies and burial grounds and a couple of museums.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Paracas.  There isn’t too much going on in this small town, but you can easily walk to the boat dock to catch a tour of Islas Ballestas.
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Ballestas Islands.  Do you know that all that guano is scraped up and sold as fertilizer?
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Ballestas Islands
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Humboldt Penguins
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Sea Lions
KDickinson Photography - Peru
That face!
KDickinson Photography - Peru
Lima completed our circle around southern Peru, unfortunately, we only had one day to explore.

One thing I wish I would have done during this trip to Peru was to have taken notes during our tours or written in a journal at the end of each day.  We learned so much about the history and culture from various tour guides (and most of that information is not readily available on the internet).

We pieced together this three week trip as we went along and it was extremely exhausting at times, but we sure covered a lot of ground.  There are so many little details about places we visited that I just cannot remember.  So take my advice, if you want to retell the stories with accuracy or make a scrapbook of your journey, keep a journal, record things with your phone, take pictures of interpretive signs – whatever you need to do to remember the details.

One thought

  1. What a fun trip! I hope there’s a part 3 coming. The picture of the Monasteria de Santa Catalina took me back to my architectural development classes some 30 years ago (when you were just a little little girl). We spent quite a bit of time discussing the structural systems used in these old structures. Thanks for another trip down memory lane. PHOTOROGR

    Liked by 1 person

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